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Top language and translation related tweets in February

February has been especially fruitful considering the number and the quality of translation and language related content published. That's why I decided to make a list of most popular and valuable tweets, so you could look through them. Who knows, maybe you will find something really useful here that you missed ;)
So here's the list!


linguagreca (Catherine Christaki)


s_noller (Sara Noller Carreto)

laleksandrowic Lucyna Aleksandrowic


camitranslation (Camelia L Services)

erik_hansson (Erik Hansson)

prozcom (ProZ.com)



luismnd (Luis Mondragón)

erik_hansson (Erik Hansson)

erik_hansson (Erik Hansson)


ntceline (Céline Graciet)
xosecastro (Xosé Castro)
lrejter (Łukasz Rejter)

abletranslation (AbleTranslations)
erik_hansson (Erik Hansson)

whereareyouliz (Liz Henry)

lek_vd (Iulianna vd Lek)

renatobeninatto (Renato Beninatto)
prozcom (ProZ.com)










lucassevilla (Lucas Sevilla)


erik_hansson (Erik Hansson)



Hope you find the list helpful ;) And if you would like to add your favourite translation and language related tweet of the month, you are welcome to share it in comments!

Comments

  1. How was this list determined? In other words how did you measure "top" tweets?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Sajan, thanks for your comment.
      I used a website called Topsy.com for that. You can search there different tweets by hashtags for any period of time and it also shows you the number of retweets and mentions. That's how I came up with this list. I chose tweets that were retweeted no less than 6 times. In fact, a few of these tweets were retweeted and mentioned more than 60 times.

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