Skip to main content

Good-bye to Google Reader... Welcome, Feedly!

'No unread items' photo (c) 2006, Trevor Manteranch - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/
At first I really freaked out when I heard that Google Reader is soon going to die. I've been using it for years and I really got used to it. But then I read a post in Buffer blog about 5 other services that can substitute Google Reader. I am an avid user of the Buffer application for Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn, so I really needed something that could seamlessly work with it, so I don’t have to change my ways too much. I have to admit, I wasn’t very creative or original when I decided to try the first item on their list, Feedly.

I have to tell you, I just love it. That’s the reason for this post actually :)

First of all, it was really easy to migrate. I just had to log into Feedly with my Google account and that was it!

I also love how it classifies the content. I can tag a blog as “favourite” and then I will see new posts from it featured in my newsfeed. I can also make custom categories, which I have done and now I can browse new posts by categories. Right now I have “translation blogs”, “freelancing”, “writing and blogging”, “languages and culture” and some other categories. Of course you can also just choose to read all the latest unread posts.

This post from Feedly blog will be useful as it has links to Feedly extensions for different browsers. I use Feedly for Firefox and it works very well. Whenever I want/have some free time I just click on the the icon on my browser panel, and Feedly opens in a new window.

Here are some more tips specially for those migrating to Feedly from Google Reader. Hope you find this post useful. Have you found your alternative to Google Reader? Which one? Let’s create a useful collection here in comments!

Comments

  1. I found this

    http://blogtrottr.com/

    Not sure if i need more email though

    :-0

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Jonathan. Yeah, I've been trying to declutter my email, too :)

      Delete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Clients vs translators: how do we show that we're honest?

This is a personal post, and I'd really like to hear the opinion of my colleagues about such situations and how to deal with them. My situation is kind of like the one described in Mox's blog . In December a new prospective client wrote to me asking about my availabiility for a new project. When I read the overall description of the project, I got really interested in it. But the client needed to know exactly how much time it would take and how much it would cost. No problem, just send me the text to look through or a part of it so I could get the gist of the style, level of complexity etc. In the reply that person just stated the wordcount, but there was no sample. I thought, maybe they didn't understand me. English is not my native language after all. In my reply, I stated the estimated time and cost based on the client's wordcount, but I repeated the request to see a part of the text. And then the person thanked me and ... disappeared.

15 interesting facts about the English language

I prepared this list for one of my English classes. And then it dawned on me that I can share it with you, too! So here are 15 facts about the English language that I find very interesting. Hope you do, too ;) Rudyard Kipling was fired as a reporter for the San Francisco Examiner. His dismissal letter said, "I'm sorry, Mr. Kipling, but you just don't know how to use the English language. This isn't a kindergarten for amateur writers." No language has more synonyms than English.

How to Reply To a Negative Feedback About Your Translation

We are humans and we screw up many times! And receiving a negative feedback about your translation work if one of them. As translation professionals, we work daily with people from different cultures and backgrounds. So, it is quite important to keep a level of etiquette while we do our business communication. Whatever your years of experience or your educational background, there are times when daily life affects our business badly. It is how we react to these situations what makes a big difference between professional translation service providers and those who are not. I was lucky enough when I started my translation career back in 2004 to read about the “ A Complaint Is a Gift ” business book and receive my training by a true professional Arabic translator. My colleague taught me the tactics of a professional’s reply to a negative feedback and the book mentions the bright side of receiving a complaint about your work. If the client does not like your work, he can just m