Skip to main content

Being an introverted freelancer

This post was inspired by a very special blog called "Dance with me", specifically by the latest post called "Being an introvert".
I know the author of this blog personally. Geri lived in Vladimir, Russia, for a year. Besides many other things she did here, she was also one of the volunteer teachers in the English language club we held for underprivileged kids. She is a brilliant person, a great teacher, a wonderful dancer, and a gifted choreographer.

I am not an extreme introvert. In fact, I'm somewhere in the middle between an extravert and an introvert. That's how my introverted side shows itself: I love having a handful of close friends, because for me friends are not people with whom we just speak about weather or latest fashion trends, or other superficial stuff. I love reflecting on deep subjects and then writing down my observations in my diary or sharing them with a close friend over a cup of tea. I love being quiet in a group of people because it's interesting to know what others think and feel. I love being alone in my house and working on a new project. I love spending my time in silence, reading a good book, thinking, journaling, praying.

Now, the question is the following: does a freelancer absolutely have to be an extravert in order to be successful? I asked this question on Twitter and Facebook a few days ago and got one answer that yes, a freelancer has to be an extravert, and two replies from introverted freelance translators who feel very comfortable with what they are doing now. I tend to agree with those two freelancers: introverts CAN be successful freelancers. They are different, yes, but they have many unique traits that can help them become a real success.

Now I have to admit that I don't even know how to end this post. I guess I wrote it to make sure I am okay with my introverted part. Yes, I am okay with it. I love being an introvert, too =)

Comments

  1. Hi Olga,

    I just found your blog via @EwelinaGonera. Very interesting subject here. I'm a freelance translator and interpreter and would also classify myself as more introverted than extroverted. Group situations are not my forte, but I've found that I have no problem talking one-on-one to strangers, so I leverage that as much as possible.

    I also think interpreting (as opposed to only translating) helps keep me balanced, since it gets me out of the quiet solitude of my office.

    Best regards,

    Holly

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you for the comment, Holly! Very interesting!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Clients vs translators: how do we show that we're honest?

This is a personal post, and I'd really like to hear the opinion of my colleagues about such situations and how to deal with them. My situation is kind of like the one described in Mox's blog . In December a new prospective client wrote to me asking about my availabiility for a new project. When I read the overall description of the project, I got really interested in it. But the client needed to know exactly how much time it would take and how much it would cost. No problem, just send me the text to look through or a part of it so I could get the gist of the style, level of complexity etc. In the reply that person just stated the wordcount, but there was no sample. I thought, maybe they didn't understand me. English is not my native language after all. In my reply, I stated the estimated time and cost based on the client's wordcount, but I repeated the request to see a part of the text. And then the person thanked me and ... disappeared.

15 interesting facts about the English language

I prepared this list for one of my English classes. And then it dawned on me that I can share it with you, too! So here are 15 facts about the English language that I find very interesting. Hope you do, too ;) Rudyard Kipling was fired as a reporter for the San Francisco Examiner. His dismissal letter said, "I'm sorry, Mr. Kipling, but you just don't know how to use the English language. This isn't a kindergarten for amateur writers." No language has more synonyms than English.

So you are a busy freelancer. How to keep your blog alive?

I decided to write this post thanks to my dear Twitter friend and colleague Sarai Pahla who mentioned once on Twitter that she honestly wonders how I find time for blogging regularly. Well, I am about to share my secret with you now. I am also going to share a couple tricks that help other blogging translators. Interested? Then read further.