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Commenting policy


There have been a few instances already when I saw comments that were not really comments to my posts, but were pure advertisements, contained SEO phrases etc. So I had to come up with commenting policy. All comments that don't go with this commenting policy will be deleted.
Your comments are extremely valuable for me, so if you have something you want to say, I am very happy for you to share your experience and ideas. I love it when colleagues come together to share their experiences and we have had a few very interesting discussions in this blog. I hope that we will have more discussions in future, because this exchange of ideas and experiences is beneficial to everybody. If you have any questions about translation, interpreting, language teaching/learning, Russian culture/tourism or marketing for freelance translators you are welcome to post them here at any time.
However, I will not permit anyone to attack, insult or threaten people here. This is a translation blog and there’s no room for bigotry, hatred or profanity. Similarly, as I am responsible for what is published here, if I am aware that a libellous comment has been made, it will be removed.
Comments left here that are off topic or demonstrate that the commenter did not bother to read the post, will be deleted. Such comments waste everyone’s time and are disrespectful to the readers and to me.
Please do not leave your comment using just a SEO keyphrase, service name or the name of your business etc. If you do, your comment will not be published. I want real people commenting here.
You are welcome to put your name, nickname or handle, along with a short descriptive, such as:
“Barbara Smith – Marketing Services”
or “Bob – Web Designer”
or “Scobleizer – Tech Reporter”
Enjoy the blog, enjoy commenting and keep it human ;)

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10 interesting facts about the Russian language

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1. Russian has about 500,000 words, but only 2,000-2,500 of them are used frequently. 100 most frequently used words make 20% of all written and oral speech. A high school graduate's vocabulary usually has 1,500 to 4,000 words. Those who have graduated from a higher educational institution normally have a richer vocabulary consisting of approximately 8,000 words.
2. It's compulsory for all astronauts in the international space station to learn Russian, so we can call it an international language of space :)

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